Posts Tagged ‘year in review’

2014: The Year of the Patient

December 17, 2014

As we reach the end of another year, we once again look back at recent advancements and milestones in the field of personalized medicine. As we celebrated 10 years of progress, we also looked toward the future, identifying changes needed to ensure another decade of discovery. Reflecting upon the highlights of 2014, it is clear that this truly was the year of the patient. A renewed sense of urgency to shift towards a more patient-centered approach to care has been created across the healthcare system.

The following captures highlights from The Age of Personalized Medicine Blog for 2014.

Michael Kolodziej, M.D., National Medical Director for Oncology, Office of the Chief Medical Officer, Aetna, kicked off the year with reflections on the challenges facing the adoption of personalized medicine.

So what are the practical challenges? There are many. And many share the underlying theme that the old paradigms do not work so well. … Perhaps the biggest challenges lie in the area of clinical utility, which impacts providers, payers and regulatory agencies. Patients are impacted in a huge way. Most people have an idea of where we need to go, but we have a shortage of ideas about how to get there. Finally, all of this occurs in the setting of unsustainable growth in health care spending, and the near uniform agreement that we need to spend our money in a more intelligent, impactful way. … We have a lot of work to do together.

In March, we were honored to share the personal and candid story of Stephanie Dunn Haney, a lung cancer survivor, and her experience with molecular testing and targeted therapies. Stephanie’s story continues to remind us of the hope personalized medicine offers to so many.

Molecular testing and personalized medicine gave me my life back, and my sense of a future back. While I’m realistic enough to know that my daughters are fairly certain to lose their mother before they are grown, I also know I have tools to fight with, and a responsibility to share my story.

As we talk about the need to keep the patient at the center of all that we do, we at the Personalized Medicine Coalition (PMC) saw a need to establish a baseline of consumer awareness, knowledge and attitudes about personalized medicine. In July, PMC released a national survey, U.S. Public Opinion About Personalized Medicine, with key findings that will guide future outreach and education efforts.

We’re at the beginning of the golden age of personalized medicine. Armed now with a clear picture of the public’s opinion, we have an opportunity to raise awareness and increase understanding of what personalized medicine is, and how it can transform approaches to healthcare delivery.

Of course, in order to bring molecular tests and targeted therapies to patients, key regulatory and reimbursement areas must be addressed. PMC also published The Future of Coverage and Payment for Personalized Medicine Diagnostics in Julywhich took a critical look at CMS policies, highlighting specific challenges to the further implementation of personalized medicine diagnostics.  Later that month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) released its long-awaited final guidance on the regulation of companion diagnostic devices, as well as proposed framework for regulating laboratory developed tests (LDTs).

Investors have long argued that clarity is necessary in both regulation and reimbursement for continued advancement of personalized medicine. We now have clarity on FDA’s current thinking although many issues remain unresolved. The community has time to consider this framework and may soon have a chance to provide public comments. And finally, the pharmaceutical industry has the FDA’s assurance that targeted treatments will not be held up by co-development challenges.

In October 2014, the PMC, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), and Feinstein Kean Healthcare (FKH) convened the second national Turning the Tide Against Cancer national conference, which brought together leaders throughout the healthcare and policy communities for a passionate and engaging discussion on the importance of moving towards a more high-value, patient-centric system of cancer care.

Keynote speaker, cancer survivor, and The New York Times Emmy® Award winning columnist of “Life, Interrupted,” Suleika Jaouad, shared insights into communication challenges patients face during a Q&A session. Suleika’s words serve as a reminder that if we are to increase adoption of personalized healthcare, we must ensure patients are given the tools and education needed to properly understand their treatment options.

Communication is the golden ticket. We live in the WebMD age where patients often consult Google before they consult a doctor. This can be dangerous and can lead to misinformation and misunderstandings. Creating an environment where the patient feels comfortable asking questions and talking to their medical team is crucial.

Following the conference, FKH Chairman, Marcia A. Kean, M.B.A., proposed next steps:

I propose that every individual touched by cancer, and every organization concerned about the nation’s cancer burden, take responsibility for three actions.

  1. Review the Issue Brief, and share your thoughts/ideas about the policy options and/or propose other options
    .
  2. Involve your organization in the Turning the Tide Against Cancer Through Sustained Medical Innovation initiative, by participating in our activities and events.

  3. Join our partners PMC and AACR and advocate for those options that you agree with, integrating them into your own policy platforms and your communications with policymakers in order to drive momentum and catalyze change.

We encourage you to learn more about the Turning the Tide Against Cancer initiative, and the important work we are doing to make a difference for cancer patients.

As an appropriate end to the year, we celebrated the 10th Anniversary Personalized Medicine Conference in November, and conference organizer Raju Kucherlapati, Ph.D., Paul C. Cabot Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, reflected on a decade of developments in personalized medicine.

The past decade has witnessed many exciting new developments in personalized medicine: the significant reduction in the cost of DNA sequencing and related technologies; the use of these technologies for an unprecedented rate of discovery of human disease genes; a near universal acceptance of the importance of genetics and genomics in drug development, especially for cancer; the levels of investment in personalized medicine companies; recognition of the importance of personalized medicine by professional societies; and the deep involvement by the administrative and legislative bodies in the U.S. and throughout the world.

2014 was a milestone year. We look forward to the year ahead, and the continued opportunity to engage with leaders throughout the personalized medicine community, and across the healthcare system, to discuss the future of personalized healthcare and how we can provide the best value to patients.


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