Required Reading: August 2014

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Great stories are published daily about the impact personalized medicine is having on individual patients, and the medical community as a whole, but it can be a challenge to stay on top of the news. With that in mind, we bring to you a monthly roundup of the three to five most thought-provoking articles we are reading, sharing and discussing with our colleagues.

This is the August 2014 installment of Required Reading.


The Price of Personalization by Timothy Gower, Proto Magazine

This article explores the growing debate over the cost and value of personalized medicines and identifies ways that the healthcare system may need to adapt to accommodate the development and use of increasingly more targeted therapies that work for smaller patient populations.

FDA to Regulate Thousands Of Cancer, Genetic, and Other Diagnostics by Matthew Herper, Forbes

Earlier this month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced plans to regulate laboratory developed tests, many of which are diagnostics developed as result of the exploding field of genetics. The new regulatory framework proposes that any test used to diagnose a disease or to decide on a course of treatment will need to be cleared by FDA before it can be utilized.

It’s Time for Us to Think About Cancer Differently by Paul Mejia, Newsweek

A recent genomic study published in the journal Cell suggests that 1 in 10 cancer patients could be more accurately diagnosed if cancer were defined by molecular and genetic characteristics, rather than by where it is located. Researchers believe that reclassifying cancer by identifying the type of cell that caused the disease, instead of the tissue type, could ultimately lead to better treatment in the future.

RNA Combination Therapy for Lung Cancer Offers Promise for Personalized Medicine by Kevin Leonardi, MIT News

Early research at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT offers promise for personalized cancer treatments using RNA combination therapies to improve therapeutic response. The development of an efficient delivery system of individual or combined small RNAs to solid tumors could help regulate genetic mutations underlying a given patient’s cancer.

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