Required Reading: June 2014

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Great stories are published daily about the impact personalized medicine is having on individual patients, and the medical community as a whole, but it can be a challenge to stay on top of the news. With that in mind, we bring to you a monthly roundup of the three to five most thought-provoking articles we are reading, sharing and discussing with our colleagues.

This is the first installment of Required Reading.


Drugmakers Find Breakthroughs in Medicine Tailored to Individuals’ Genetic Makeups by Brady Dennis, The Washington Post

One-size-fits-all blockbuster drugs are giving way to treatments tailored to individuals’ genetic makeups. This article highlights the advantages of these targeted treatments, posing important questions that regulators, drug makers, insurers and patients alike need to consider as more specialized drugs come to market, including who will benefit and how to ensure patients have access to life-saving treatments.

In a First, Test of DNA Finds Root of Illness by Carl Zimmer, The New York Times

Diagnosis is a crucial step in medicine, but it can also be the most difficult. A new DNA sequencing technology, called unbiased next-generation sequencing, can identify a pathogen by testing DNA samples from a patient and then comparing fragments with genetic sequences stored in online databases. This technology has the potential to not only provide speedy diagnoses to critically ill patients, but could lead to more effective treatments for diseases that can be hard to identify.

The Perfect Drug by Erin Biba, Newsweek

This article highlights how continued innovation in our understanding of cancer and the emergence of companies providing personalized treatments helped change one patient’s life by turning his cancer diagnosis from a death sentence into a managed chronic illness.

Keeping the Patient at the Center of Cancer Innovation by Amy Abernethy, M.D., Ph.D. and Arif Kamal, M.D., The Hill’s Congress Blog

Hot on the heels of the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting and Institute of Medicine’s National Cancer Policy Forum earlier this month, this op-ed focuses on the role of medical innovation and patient-centered approaches in the growing discussion on the cost and value of cancer research and care.

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