Archive for the ‘targeted therapies’ Category

Survey Reveals Insights About Awareness, Understanding of Personalized Medicine, Part 2

September 16, 2014

Following the launch of the Personalized Medicine Coalition’s U.S. Public Opinion About Personalized Medicine survey results, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America’s (PhRMA) asked the panelists from our launch event at the National Press Club – What key benefits of personalized medicine do you think the public needs to know about in order to embrace this approach to health care?

The survey, conducted by KRC Research, tells us that most Americans do not know what personalized medicine is, but once the concept is explained to them they are very supportive of advancing the field. In these short video interviews, each of these experts weighs in on how we connect the dots from lack of knowledge to wide support for personalized medicine.

The full set of video responses can be viewed on PhRMA’s Conversations blog, with additional commentary from Raju Kucherlapati, M.D., Professor, Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and Mark Richards, Senior Vice President, Management Supervisor at KRC Research.

Amy M. Miller, Ph.D., Executive Vice President, Personalized Medicine Coalition, discusses how personalized medicine is changing the way we experience health care today, including the development of the first cystic fibrosis treatment in over 20 years and other medicines that are improving patients’ quality of life.

Donna R. Cryer, J.D., President and CEO, Global Liver Institute, talks about the importance of educating both patients and clinicians about personalized medicine and its potential benefit, as well as her personal experience as a patient who has benefited from targeted treatments.

Randy Burkholder, Vice President, Policy, PhRMA, highlights the important future of personalized medicine and the commitment of America’s biopharmaceutical research companies to advancing the field and the science of personalized medicine.

Learn more about U.S. Public Opinion About Personalized Medicine and review the survey findings by reading Part 1 of our series or visiting the PMC website.

Required Reading: August 2014

August 28, 2014

Great stories are published daily about the impact personalized medicine is having on individual patients, and the medical community as a whole, but it can be a challenge to stay on top of the news. With that in mind, we bring to you a monthly roundup of the three to five most thought-provoking articles we are reading, sharing and discussing with our colleagues.

This is the August 2014 installment of Required Reading.


The Price of Personalization by Timothy Gower, Proto Magazine

This article explores the growing debate over the cost and value of personalized medicines and identifies ways that the healthcare system may need to adapt to accommodate the development and use of increasingly more targeted therapies that work for smaller patient populations.

FDA to Regulate Thousands Of Cancer, Genetic, and Other Diagnostics by Matthew Herper, Forbes

Earlier this month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced plans to regulate laboratory developed tests, many of which are diagnostics developed as result of the exploding field of genetics. The new regulatory framework proposes that any test used to diagnose a disease or to decide on a course of treatment will need to be cleared by FDA before it can be utilized.

It’s Time for Us to Think About Cancer Differently by Paul Mejia, Newsweek

A recent genomic study published in the journal Cell suggests that 1 in 10 cancer patients could be more accurately diagnosed if cancer were defined by molecular and genetic characteristics, rather than by where it is located. Researchers believe that reclassifying cancer by identifying the type of cell that caused the disease, instead of the tissue type, could ultimately lead to better treatment in the future.

RNA Combination Therapy for Lung Cancer Offers Promise for Personalized Medicine by Kevin Leonardi, MIT News

Early research at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT offers promise for personalized cancer treatments using RNA combination therapies to improve therapeutic response. The development of an efficient delivery system of individual or combined small RNAs to solid tumors could help regulate genetic mutations underlying a given patient’s cancer.

Survey Reveals Insights About Awareness, Understanding of Personalized Medicine, Part 1

August 22, 2014

Earlier this year, the Personalized Medicine Coalition (PMC) commissioned U.S. Public Opinion About Personalized Medicine, a nationally representative survey of 1,024 adults gauging consumer awareness, knowledge and attitudes about personalized medicine.

The key findings of the survey were positive. Although less than 4 in 10 Americans had heard of it prior to being surveyed, respondents are interested in learning more about personalized medicine and are supportive of the concept. For those who had heard of personalized medicine, their knowledge was shallow and did not associate the term with diagnostic testing or targeted treatments. This highlights the need for education to a willing public.

When the surveyed individuals were given a definition of personalized medicine, approximately two-thirds were receptive and expressed positive opinions about its prospects.

Respondents easily pointed out the major benefits of personalized medicine, noting that it could give them more knowledge to prevent or treat their illness, help them choose the most effective treatments with their doctors, and lead to a decline in unnecessary treatments, side effects, invasive procedures and trial and error medicine.

Many of the individuals who were surveyed even raised questions, specifically regarding the efficacy, potential risks, cost, access and affordability. A majority agreed that insurance should cover personalized medicine if it is recommended by a doctor.

We’re at the beginning of the golden age of personalized medicine. Armed now with a clear picture of the public’s opinion, we have an opportunity to raise awareness and increase understanding of what personalized medicine is, and how it can transform approaches to healthcare delivery.

Stay tuned for part two of this blog post series as we hear from leading experts, and the researcher who conducted the survey, on what key benefits of personalized medicine they think the public needs to know about in order to embrace this approach to healthcare.

In the meantime, learn more about U.S. Public Opinion About Personalized Medicine and review the survey findings by viewing the slideshow below or visiting the PMC website.

Required Reading: June 2014

June 24, 2014

Great stories are published daily about the impact personalized medicine is having on individual patients, and the medical community as a whole, but it can be a challenge to stay on top of the news. With that in mind, we bring to you a monthly roundup of the three to five most thought-provoking articles we are reading, sharing and discussing with our colleagues.

This is the first installment of Required Reading.


Drugmakers Find Breakthroughs in Medicine Tailored to Individuals’ Genetic Makeups by Brady Dennis, The Washington Post

One-size-fits-all blockbuster drugs are giving way to treatments tailored to individuals’ genetic makeups. This article highlights the advantages of these targeted treatments, posing important questions that regulators, drug makers, insurers and patients alike need to consider as more specialized drugs come to market, including who will benefit and how to ensure patients have access to life-saving treatments.

In a First, Test of DNA Finds Root of Illness by Carl Zimmer, The New York Times

Diagnosis is a crucial step in medicine, but it can also be the most difficult. A new DNA sequencing technology, called unbiased next-generation sequencing, can identify a pathogen by testing DNA samples from a patient and then comparing fragments with genetic sequences stored in online databases. This technology has the potential to not only provide speedy diagnoses to critically ill patients, but could lead to more effective treatments for diseases that can be hard to identify.

The Perfect Drug by Erin Biba, Newsweek

This article highlights how continued innovation in our understanding of cancer and the emergence of companies providing personalized treatments helped change one patient’s life by turning his cancer diagnosis from a death sentence into a managed chronic illness.

Keeping the Patient at the Center of Cancer Innovation by Amy Abernethy, M.D., Ph.D. and Arif Kamal, M.D., The Hill’s Congress Blog

Hot on the heels of the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting and Institute of Medicine’s National Cancer Policy Forum earlier this month, this op-ed focuses on the role of medical innovation and patient-centered approaches in the growing discussion on the cost and value of cancer research and care.

Making the Case for Personalized Medicine

June 18, 2014

As lawmakers, industry, consumer groups and the general public debate the future of health care, personalized medicine continues to focus attention-with good reason. In a time of unprecedented scientific breakthroughs and technological advancements, personalized health care has the capacity to detect the onset of disease at its earliest stages, preempt the progression of disease, and, at the same time, increase the efficiency of the health care system by improving quality, accessibility, and affordability.

With that in mind, I’m excited to announce the release of the fourth edition of Personalized Medicine Coalition’s signature document, The Case for Personalized Medicine, which notes the steady development of the field. Most notably, in 2006, there were 13 prominent examples of personalized drugs, treatments and diagnostics on the market. In 2011, there were 72, and today there are 113-a 57 percent increase in the last three years.

Along with this steady growth, we also examine opportunities for the continued development and adoption of personalized medicine as several factors come into play: the cost of genetic sequencing declines, the pharmaceutical industry increases its commitment to personalized treatment, and the public policy landscape evolves. While momentum is building, much remains to be done to keep up with the evolving developments in science and technology, according to the report. With all this progress comes a greater responsibility to actually help patients by advancing personalized medicine to make it standard practice in the near future.

According to The Case, personalized medicine can accomplish the following:

  • Shift the emphasis in medicine from reaction to prevention
  • Direct the selection of optimal therapy and reduce trial-and-error prescribing
  • Help avoid adverse drug reactions
  • Increase patient adherence to treatment
  • Improve quality of life
  • Reveal additional or alternative uses for medicines and drug candidates
  • Help control the overall cost of health care

But to advance personalized medicine, we need intelligent coverage and payment policies, clearer regulatory guidelines, and modernized professional education to prepare the next generation of doctors and other health care professionals for personalized medicine.

PMC is pleased to partner with BIO and release this report at the Personalized Medicine & Diagnostics Forum at this year’s meeting. The Forum takes place next Wednesday, June 25 at 9 a.m. PT in room 7AB and will explore many of the salient issues facing personalized medicine, as discussed in The Case. If you’re onsite at BIO this year, come check out the forum. We’d love to hear your thoughts on the current personalized medicine landscape and what’s to come.

The new edition of The Case for Personalized Medicine will be available online June 25 at 9 a.m. ET, but in the meantime, check out PMC’s other publications here.


This blog post originally appeared in BIOtechNow, the blog of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO).

 

Prescribe by Price, But at What Cost to Patients?

June 16, 2014

In recent months, there has been increased discussion about the cost and value of cancer care. These conversations are important, but it’s crucial to make sure the patient’s unique perspective on value isn’t lost in the mix. We must also be sure we are considering each patient’s unique diagnosis, as well as the heterogeneity of their disease.

It is clear that targeted therapies play an important role in delivering personalized care to patients, and in particular, those with many forms of cancer. A recent article in Newsweek profiled a patient who, through a new tumor identification method, was able to receive a highly-targeted treatment for his sarcoma. As noted in the article, “the slow and steady march of innovation in our understanding of cancer and the emergence of companies providing personalized treatments have not only saved Rose’s life but allowed him to turn his cancer from a death sentence into a chronic illness that simply needs regular managing.”

These stories are becoming more common, yet as new targeted treatments work through the regulatory pathways, we are faced with ongoing questions: How do we ensure patients have access to these life-saving drugs and the diagnostics used to select them? And how do we ensure the system incentivizes research and development broadly, so more people benefit from personalized medicine?

Recently, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) announced that it will be developing a scorecard, slated to come out this fall, to evaluate cancer drugs based on their cost and value, as well as their efficacy and side effects. This signifies a potential shift in the way that physicians make decisions about their patients’ health, encouraging them to consider the financial implications of interventions alongside patients’ needs. As this framework is developed, it will be important to ensure that the full value of innovative interventions is recognized.

Scientific advances have the potential to provide earlier and better diagnoses, more effective treatments and even possible cures for patients. Personalized approaches to care could provide a patient with more or better quality time to spend with their family or friends, and overall greater long-term value.

As Edward Abrahams, president of the Personalized Medicine Coalition told The Washington Post, these targeted treatments also bring a greater long-term value to the healthcare system as a whole by cutting down the frequency of unnecessary treatments and procedures, and avoiding unnecessary side effects.

Still our continued focus must be on providing high-value care and creating a system that improves patient outcomes and does not place the focus on prescribing drugs based on cost or financial incentives. The Personalized Medicine Coalition, along with the American Association of Cancer Research and Feinstein Kean Healthcare, continues to engage the cancer community to address these questions of cost and value through the Turning the Tide Against Cancer initiative.

Through ongoing dialogue and discussion as part of this initiative, two key themes continually resurface as components that should be considered when defining value: advancing approaches that are patient-centered, and developing new approaches to value assessment that align with and incentivize scientific progress and innovation.

On October 9, 2014, the Personalized Medicine Coalition, the American Association of Cancer Research and Feinstein Kean Healthcare will re-convene the cancer community in Washington, D.C., for a second Turning the Tide Against Cancer national conference to advance the conversation on the value and cost, while supporting a shift to patient-centered cancer research and care.

Finding My Future, or, How to Coexist with Cancer

March 24, 2014

In October 2007, my identity was stolen.

In September 2007, I was a 39 year-old wife and mother of two young girls. Then, suddenly, I was a 39 year-old wife, mother of two young girls, and Stage IV lung cancer patient.

At the time of my diagnosis, I learned a majority of late-stage lung cancer patients die within one year. Just one year. One birthday. One summer. Would I make it to another Christmas? I didn’t know. Already a “glass half empty” kind of person, I wondered if this was my death sentence as the sense of a future ahead of me drifted away.

For the first six months, I tried traditional treatments, and I felt terrible. I was finding out what it felt like to experience the decline of death.

But here I am. More than six years later, alive and kicking. And personalized medicine is the reason.

My experience with molecular testing and targeted therapies
My first line of treatment was the classic carboplatin-taxol combo, combined with bevacizumab—the first of the newer, targeted therapies. Even though I was epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) negative and might not respond, I fit the common demographic for success closely enough that my doctor and I decided to try erlotinib with bevacizumab. That run lasted over two and a half years—precious time. I spent that time with versions of the most common side effects but otherwise felt pretty normal and lived life actively, something I never expected to do again.

During that time, I learned about the clinical trial for crizotinib on the news, and after three different people contacted me to pass along the story, I considered it an omen of sorts and asked to have my tumor specimen tested to see if I was a fit for this new personalized treatment.

When I found out I was ALK positive—and therefore likely to respond to the treatment—I felt relief. I knew how promising crizotinib already was and now I had my next plan in place. I have been on this targeted therapy for more than two years and I have been living a virtually symptom-free, normal existence with my daughters, with the hope for more.

Targeted therapies have been invaluable to my treatment. I know that I am very fortunate and remain in the minority to have my disease controlled so well. Frankly, that fuels my feeling of responsibility to do something productive to change things. So many—too many—die so quickly.

From my perspective, there are two important considerations for targeted therapies.

  1. We should use molecular testing as a way to inform treatment—not exclude access to drugs: I am enthusiastic about the value of molecular testing, and I also believe that its value lies not in its exclusionary potential, but in informing the priorities of a treatment plan.

    Having benefited over a period of almost three years from erlotinib when I tested negative for the genetic marker, I’d hate to see that same possibility be denied outright to others. I know that for some cancers and other illnesses, there is a concern about “overtreatment,” but in the lung cancer world, we’ll take whatever we get because our odds are so poor.

  2. We should better keep healthcare providers educated and up-to-date on the latest in molecular testing: I have heard horror stories about oncologists who don’t know much about the testing, never mention it to their patients, and trudge down the traditional paths without pause.

    We need better approaches to ensure doctors have access to the latest research and tools for diagnosis and treatment. I worry about the patient that doesn’t have the tools to advocate for their own healthcare.

Millions of people are depending on scientists, business people, and policymakers to keep working hard and collaborating to bring access to promising therapies to those in need and accelerate medical breakthroughs.

Now, I live with Stage IV lung cancer. It is a part of my body and part of my identity. My outlook on life has changed dramatically since my diagnosis, but my ability to take care of my daughters and live my life hasn’t at all. And that is incredible.

Molecular testing and personalized medicine gave me my life back, and my sense of a future back. While I’m realistic enough to know that my daughters are fairly certain to lose their mother before they are grown, I also know I have tools to fight with, and a responsibility to share my story.

We need earlier detection.
We need the tools to cure.
We need to increase survival for those, like me, who live with cancer.

Ten Years into Personalized Medicine: What We’ve Learned and What’s Next

January 15, 2014

Ten years ago, the sequencing of the entire human genome, along with the development of aggregate “omics” technologies began giving rise to a fundamentally new capability for the practice of medicine – the ability to predict and track disease risks on a personalized basis, to understand diseases mechanistically, and to target therapy to treat an individual’s specific disease.

Based on the potential impact of these technologies, I predicted in my 2002 Chairman’s address to the Association of American Medical Colleges, that medicine would be transformed from being disease-focused and reactive to being proactive and personalized. I believed that the “one-size-fits-all” approach to disease care was outmoded and would soon be replaced by one that would prevent and treat disease on a personalized basis.

Since its inception ten years ago, many of those predictions have been realized; personalized medicine has begun to have major impacts on components of medical practice and has engendered health care industries estimated to grow to $450 billion by 2015 with $42 billion related to drugs, devices, and diagnostics. Molecular diagnostics have gained traction in cardiology, rheumatology, transplantation, endocrinology, and, in particular, oncology. Targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer therapy and whole genome sequencing is providing insights into baseline health risks and understanding of some diseases. However, while the use of personalized medicine tools to treat disease is gaining traction, the transformation of medical practice to being proactive, strategic, and personalized; i.e., personalized health care, has been slow to develop.

There is, however, evidence that this movement is gaining momentum and with increases in health care consumerism, a more predictable regulatory environment, and changes in medical reimbursement to reward better outcomes, the adoption of personalized health care is inevitable. Personalized medicine will go beyond the use of technologies to individualize disease care to finally transforming the approach to care itself by enabling individuals and care providers to foster proactive, personalized care. In turn, the clinical adoption of proactive, personalized care will broaden the need for personalized medicine technologies thus spurring the growth of this industry.

Appreciating the value of a ten-year review of personalized medicine, the Personalized Medicine World Conference will host, and I will moderate, a panel discussion titled, “Ten Years into Personalized Medicine: What We’ve Learned & What’s Next” on January 27, 2014 in Mountain View, Calif., with luminaries including Kim Popovits of Genomic Health, Randy Scott from InVitae, Brook Byers of KPCB, and Jay Flatley from Illumina, opining on what they initially anticipated, what they’ve learned, and what’s coming next.

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 Look for additional posts from speakers and participants prior to the 6th Annual Personalized Medicine World Conference on January 27-28, 2014. For more information and the full agenda, visit: 2014sv.pmwcintl.com.

Targeted Therapies: From Promise to Reality

August 15, 2013

A recent Wall Street Journal article featured the impact that the genomics revolution is having on cancer patient care with a focus on lung cancer. The article shares a strong message of hope, detailing the scientific progress made thus far by noting that we have experienced the “most extraordinary decade of progress ever in the long scientific struggle against lung cancer,” while also pointing to the promise further personalized approaches to cancer care holds.

Lung cancer patient Kellie Carey poignantly shares her story of how she had to demand testing for her tumor to identify its mutation, opening the door for her to molecularly targeted drugs that extended her life.

This message echoes what we heard during the briefing Personalized Medicine: How Medical Progress Happens held by the Personalized Medicine Coalition on Capitol Hill just last month — in particular, the experiences of one of the speakers, lung cancer survivor Stephanie Haney (click here for a video interview with Stephanie). Stephanie and Kellie share a disease and a journey as they have both been “lucky” enough to have been diagnosed with lung cancer in the midst of a revolution in care.

For thirty years the available treatments extended life a few weeks, possibly months. Lung cancer diagnosis was an immediate and imminent death sentence. Now, Stephanie, Kellie, and others with genetically identified tumor mutations have access to targeted treatments that are extending their lives years longer than those lung cancer patients on chemotherapy only and without identified mutations.

These are just two examples of the value of innovative therapies, particularly molecularly targeted drugs. The promise of personalized medicine is very real. Personalized medicine is not an abstract concept for the future of medicine. It is here, it is now, and the true promise has been realized in the lives of Kellie and Stephanie, and the precious days, weeks, months, and years they have taken back from their disease.

And now it is our promise to Kellie, Stephanie, and others to continue to push forward, toward further discovery, and to drive innovation.  There are nearly 1,000 new medicines in the pipeline for cancer alone.  We can all do our part by supporting policies that enable and encourage innovation and allow the science to guide us.

Angelina Jolie Lends Her Voice and Experience to Personalized Medicine

May 16, 2013

It was great to see Angelina Jolie’s eloquent op-ed in the May 14 edition of The New York Times. She carefully wove her personal experience with the importance of genetic testing and using the resulting information to make an informed health decision. I applaud her decision to go public with her story as a great example of patient empowerment but also as a powerful example of personalized medicine in action.

Despite all the advances we have made in recent years, we all know that the concept of personalized medicine is still foreign to most Americans. PMC recently conducted focus groups which strongly reminded us of the uphill battle that remains to gain public understanding of and support for personalized medicine. In our groups only one or two out of 52 participants were able to correctly describe the concept.

We found that people are very enthusiastic about personalized medicine once they understand it but it is a complex concept which is often misunderstood. It turns out that giving clear, specific examples of personalized diagnostics and treatments is the best way to explain what personalized medicine is and the benefits it can bring.

Ms. Jolie’s contribution demonstrates that without patients who are educated, empowered to get tested and to act, the progress and innovation could be for naught. We need to make sure that patients are knowledgeable enough to pursue personalized options for their own health but also so that they are motivated to support policies that foster continued progress in this area.

Angelina Jolie’s op-ed is an important and high-profile contribution to the discourse about patient experience and personalized medicine.  Her voice echoes the words of Adriana Jenkins, who courageously shared her battle against breast cancer and joins other advocates like Donna Cryer, who works tirelessly to remind all stakeholders about how personalize medicine is a patient-centric approach to healthcare. Courageous individuals, like Ms. Jolie, who publicly share their personal stories have the power to bolster both public and media discourse around patient empowerment, for example with CNN “Early Start” co-anchor Zoraida Sambolin’s disclosure of her own breast cancer diagnosis and treatment decision live on air.

I hope that Ms. Jolie’s op-ed raises awareness of personalized medicine and the options patients have to take control of their healthcare.  No single organization alone can raise public awareness on the scale that we need but through a steady stream of individual op-eds, blog posts, conversations, etc., we in the personalized medicine community can spotlight more stories like this and begin to educate the public.  I look forward to hearing more voices from the community and hope that their contributions will support personalized medicine research, patient and provider engagement, and thoughtful policy.


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